11 Ways To Dominate Tomahawk-Throwing Contests

Tom­a­hawk-throw­ing con­tests are about crush­ing your oppo­nents on every lev­el. Here’s a roundup of today’s fresh styles that’ll help you humil­i­ate the com­pe­ti­tion. 


RAGE YOUR ANTHEM

Your com­peti­tors can’t throw a tom­a­hawk with an unsteady hand. Make them trem­ble in fear as you rock the woods with the sounds of Sur­vivor.

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BRING A QUIVER

Only ama­teurs show up to a throw­ing axe com­pe­ti­tion with just one throw­ing axe. (Pro Tip: Leave room for a han­dle of whiskey.)

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THROW FAST

A light axe enables faster, more agile throws, like the mid-air flip-throw and the “watch me hit that mov­ing branch” throw.

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BE HISTORIC

Get your­self a tom­a­hawk based on the ones used in Nam then show those hip­pies how to use it.

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SMASH YOUR TARGET TO PIECES

Bring at least one show­piece tom­a­hawk bad enough to bring down a bison. The fact that you own it will set their nerves on edge.

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WHIP OFF YOUR WOOD

Wood-framed shades make you seem at peace with all things in the forest—until you whip them off, ready to burn the com­pe­ti­tion to the ground.

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BEAR YOUR CHEST

To win a tom­a­hawk-throw­ing con­test, you must first unleash your inner beast. 

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STRETCH IT OUT

It’s a long walk back to the throwin’ line. Wear pants that can sus­tain a big strut.

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AXE NOTHING OF THEM

Bring your own hood­ie to keep your hands and arms warm. Up the intim­i­da­tion lev­el by rock­ing one with dou­ble-axes on the breast.

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WEAR NINJA SHOES

Run­ning footwear with a grip­py sole will keep you from slip­ping up and send­ing a tom­a­hawk through your tent.

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PSYCHE ‘EM OUT

They’re mid-throw. Sud­den­ly: Duel­ing ban­jos (ukulele ver­sion). Toss in a death-stare and they’ll crum­ple before you.

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Editor’s Note: The Clymb launch­es new prod­ucts every day and our inven­to­ry goes fast. If you see some­thing you like, buy it fast or get used to the bit­ter taste of regret. To read our non-prod­uct-relat­ed sto­ries, click here.