hiking guide

hiking guideNot every­one is work­ing for the week­end. Plen­ty of job oppor­tu­ni­ties exist that will cat­a­pult you into an adven­ture every day. Some are cus­tomer ser­vice ori­ent­ed, oth­ers are phys­i­cal­ly demand­ing and almost every great adven­ture job requires advanced cer­ti­fi­ca­tions and experience.

Get­ting the Gig
The best jobs out there are extreme­ly com­pet­i­tive. Secur­ing a few sol­id ref­er­ences is crit­i­cal, espe­cial­ly if they are con­nect­ed and respect­ed with­in the indus­try. You can also posi­tion your­self ahead of the pack by vol­un­tar­i­ly gain­ing cer­ti­fi­ca­tions in advance. Basic CPR and First Aid serve as a base­line and are always required for field posi­tions. Wilder­ness First Respon­der is one that every out­door job posi­tion respects. The course is a great expe­ri­ence and one you will nev­er regret any­ways. Swift­wa­ter Res­cue is imper­a­tive for jobs on rivers and coast guard cer­ti­fi­ca­tions are often required for run­ning boats in coastal areas. Deck­hands and sup­port staff will have less strin­gent require­ments but man­ning a ves­sel comes with some seri­ous responsibility.

Work­ing Your Way Up
Every­one starts some­where and get­ting a foot in the door is impor­tant. Sup­port staff roles are eas­i­er to obtain and they present the oppor­tu­ni­ty to prove your work eth­ic and desire to grow with­in a spe­cif­ic com­pa­ny. When apply­ing for these jobs, make your intent for advance­ment clear. You can run shut­tles and row the gear boats before advanc­ing to guide sta­tus. Know­ing every aspect of the oper­a­tion is a bonus in the long run.


river guideWhite­wa­ter Raft Guides
Run­ning white­wa­ter on a dai­ly basis is hard to beat for adven­ture. Numer­ous out­fits pro­vide train­ing for rook­ie guides and start you on mild runs and day trips. The most cov­et­ed posi­tions are found on mul­ti-day trips in loca­tions like the Grand Canyon and Mid­dle Fork of the Salmon. Get your feet wet and this path can take you all over the world. You might run the Rogue Riv­er in Ore­gon all sum­mer then head south to Chile for a win­ter on the Futaleufú.

Back­coun­try Canoe Guides
If you pre­fer a slow­er pace and are an edu­cat­ed nat­u­ral­ist, con­sid­er lead­ing wilder­ness canoe trips. These jobs are few and far between so plan on research­ing heav­i­ly to find an out­fit­ter with open­ings. Active oper­a­tions are run­ning in Yel­low­stone Nation­al Park, the Bound­ary Waters, numer­ous areas in Cana­da and Alas­ka as well.

Back­pack­ing Guide Jobs
Spend a sum­mer lead­ing back­pack­ing trips and you will be in great shape. The major­i­ty of these posi­tions are locat­ed in Nation­al Parks and you are respon­si­ble for the safe­ty and well being of your guests. This means set­ting a com­fort­able pace for every­one, edu­cat­ing the group and man­ag­ing a num­ber of dif­fer­ent per­son­al­i­ties. You will deal with logis­tics and meals in advance and have dif­fi­cult sit­u­a­tions like injuries in remote set­tings. Over­all, how­ev­er, you are back­pack­ing in some of the most beau­ti­ful places on earth.

Alas­ka Fish­ing Guides
Imag­ine run­ning jet boats upbraid­ed rivers and land­ing trout and salmon next to feed­ing bears. Inland fish­ing guide jobs offer true wilder­ness adven­tures. Expe­ri­ence fish­ing with con­ven­tion­al and fly gear is impor­tant. You will also need an OUPV (Six Pack) coast guard license to run boats under pow­er. Some out­fit­ters will pay for the coast guard license course ($1k+) and trav­el, oth­ers will reim­burse the expense for fin­ish­ing the sea­son and some expect you to show up licensed and ready. Pay varies but tips are where you real­ly make out in these jobs. Apply ear­ly as the posi­tions are competitive.

Wild­land Firefighting
Wild­land fire­fight­ers work extreme­ly hard to pro­tect our forests. Long hours, phys­i­cal work, dif­fi­cult con­di­tions, and adver­si­ty are part of the deal. You can make great mon­ey with unlim­it­ed over­time on big fires. Hot­shot crews are excel­lent but not easy to crack. For­est ser­vice and state jobs are pop­u­lar with tons of dif­fer­ent job roles. You might dri­ve a water truck, work the front lines, trans­port staff or cook at the camp­sites. Get start­ed by locat­ing a phys­i­cal test course. After pass­ing the phys­i­cal you receive a red card and can pur­sue advanced edu­ca­tion­al cours­es while apply­ing for pri­vate or pub­lic sec­tor jobs.

Glac­i­er Nation­al Park, Montana

What kind of life would it be like to have an awe­some adven­ture every month of the year? An awe­some one. That’s the answer. And if you want to start pur­su­ing the Amer­i­can dream, the best time to start plan­ning your expe­di­tions is now. While the epic­ness of an adven­ture isn’t nec­es­sar­i­ly defined by the loca­tion, dura­tion, or sport of choice, some places are always guar­an­teed to deliv­er on one hell of an expe­ri­ence. Check out this awe­some itin­er­ary for your­self and let us know if you have any epic adven­tures worth putting on the list.

Jan­u­ary — Ice Climb Ouray
Ouray Ice Park, Uncom­pah­gre Riv­er Gorge, Colorado
To exer­cise your win­ter rights in Jan­u­ary, the Ouray Ice Park of south­west­ern Col­orado tops out as some of the best ice climb­ing in the coun­try. Man-made with­in the Uncom­pah­gre Gorge of the San Juan Moun­tains, the Ouray Ice Park has hun­dreds of estab­lished ice-routes to ascend, and a thriv­ing com­mu­ni­ty of peo­ple who put it all togeth­er. Jan­u­ary is a par­tic­u­lar­ly fun time to explore Ouray Ice park, espe­cial­ly dur­ing the annu­al Ouray Ice Fes­ti­val which brings in climbers from across the world.

 

Deer Val­ley, Wasatch Moun­tains, Utah

Feb­ru­ary — Ski Six Utah Resorts (in a day)
The Ski Utah Inter­con­nect Tour, Wasatch Range, Utah
While Feb­ru­ary opens a lot of adven­tures at all your favorite ski resorts, few expe­di­tions involve hit­ting mul­ti­ple resorts in a day. The Inter­con­nect Tour from Ski Utah does. By mix­ing back­coun­try with chair lifts, this epic day tour con­nects six dif­fer­ent resorts all down the Wasatch Range. This pro­fes­sion­al­ly guid­ed adven­ture is only open to advanced and expert skiers. Bring your skills to the slopes and you can find your­self hit­ting deep pow­der in the back­coun­try and enjoy­ing the groomed tracks at Deer Val­ley, Park City and Alta (just to name a few).

 March — Snorkel in the Flori­da Keys
Bis­cayne Nation­al Park, Florida 
There are many ways to begin your win­ter thaw. One rec­om­mend­ed course of action is div­ing into the Flori­da Keys via Bis­cayne Nation­al Park. Found off the coast of Mia­mi, Bis­cayne is com­prised of the north­ern­most Flori­da Keys. It’s defin­ing fea­tures are the azure ocean waters and abun­dance of coral reef. Pop­u­lar activ­i­ties at Bis­cayne include snor­kel­ing, kayak­ing and camp­ing at either one of the two camp­grounds (which can only be accessed by boat).

 

Appalachi­an Moun­tains, North Carolina

 April — Bikepack the Trans-WNC (West­ern North Carolina)
Appalachi­an Moun­tains, North Car­oli­na
Rotate your crank this April and find your­self a great bikepack­ing expe­di­tion. Com­bin­ing the mul­ti-night util­i­ty of back­pack­ing and the big-amount-of-miles-in-a-day capa­bil­i­ties of a moun­tain bike, back­pack­ing expos­es a lot of wilder­ness in a rel­a­tive­ly short amount of time. Take the Trans-WNC (West­ern North Car­oli­na) for exam­ple, which com­bines sin­gle-track, dirt roads and min­i­mal pave­ment to cov­er 300 miles of prime North Car­oli­na Appalachi­an ter­ri­to­ry in a pos­si­ble five-day excursion.

 

Mult­nom­ah Falls, Oregon

 May — Water­fall Explor­ing in the Colum­bia Riv­er Gorge
Colum­bia Riv­er Gorge Nation­al Scenic Area, Oregon/Washington
Sit­ting at sea-lev­el and sep­a­rat­ing the Cas­cade-laden states of Wash­ing­ton and Ore­gon, the 80-mile long Colum­bia Riv­er Gorge Nation­al Scenic Area receives a con­stant inflow of water­falls through­out the year. Vis­i­tors have hun­dreds of water­falls to choose from when vis­it­ing the gorge includ­ing the dou­ble-deck­er Mult­nom­ah Falls which drop over 600 feet com­bined. Many of the water­falls in the gorge, like Mult­nom­ah, flow year-round, but April always brings a surge. Be sure to check trail con­di­tions before going as large parts of the Colum­bia Riv­er Gorge were affect­ed by the 2017 Eagle Creek Fire.

June — Camp on an Island
Apos­tle Islands Nation­al Lakeshore, Wisconsin
Fea­tur­ing 21 islands and 12 miles of main­land coast, the Apos­tle Islands extend into Lake Supe­ri­or in north­ern Wis­con­sin to reveal a tidal-swept world. There are many pop­u­lar ways to explore the Apos­tle Islands through­out the sum­mer. One of the most adven­tur­ous includes kayak­ing the open water to find an island camp­site. Overnight explor­ers can choose between devel­oped camp­sites and more prim­i­tive, seclud­ed options as well. Oth­er avenues for enjoy­ment while vis­it­ing the islands include fish­ing, scu­ba div­ing, and hik­ing the island terrain.

July — Dri­ve the Going-to-the-Sun Road
Glac­i­er Nation­al Park, Montana
Giv­en the appro­pri­ate enor­mous land­scapes that bend over the hori­zon, the Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glac­i­er Nation­al Park is apt­ly named. With road­side stops, mul­ti­ple trail­heads, and 50 miles of a sweep­ing alpine envi­ron­ment, the Going-to-the-Sun Road is snow-free for about a quar­ter of the year. July is a prime time to check it out. Stop and nab some oth­er buck­et-list adven­tures in Glac­i­er while you’re at it. Make sure to uti­liz­ing the many ways to get around so you can take your eyes off the road.

 

Teton Range, Wyoming

August — Back­pack the Teton Crest Trail 
Grand Teton Nation­al Park, Wyoming
August is the month to head to the high coun­try. Across the Amer­i­can West, high-alpine back­pack­ing routes open from their snowy sur­round­ings and invite hik­ers to explore. A crown jew­el of those high-coun­try routes, the Teton Crest Trail tra­vers­es the Teton back­coun­try and expos­es glac­i­er-fed lakes, col­or­ful canyons, and amaz­ing wildlife. The Nation­al Park reserves two-thirds of back­coun­try per­mits for walk-up avail­abil­i­ty the day of or one day before your trip.

 Sep­tem­ber — White-Water Raft the Upper Gauley River 
Gauley Riv­er Nation­al Recre­ation Area, West Virginia
Con­sid­ered by many to be the best white-water action in the coun­try, the Upper Gauley Riv­er is released from the Sum­mersville Dam for six con­sec­u­tive week­ends after Labor Day each year. Fol­low­ing the dam release, world-class (and class V+) rapids drop 668 feet through 25 miles of rugged ter­rain. Ride the rapids on your own if you have the expe­ri­ence or uti­lize the many dif­fer­ent guide com­pa­nies that line the riv­er. Amer­i­can White­wa­ter also hosts their annu­al Gauley Fest which helps cel­e­brate and lend access to these wild rivers.

 

Adiron­dack Moun­tains, New York

 Octo­ber — Embark on the Adiron­dack Fire Tow­er Challenge
Adiron­dack Moun­tains, New York
The Adiron­dack Fire Tow­er Chal­lenge entails sum­mit­ing a total of 23 Adiron­dack and Catskill fire tow­er peaks. Peak­ing the sum­mit is all that mat­ters for this chal­lenge as some of the fire tow­er struc­tures are closed to the pub­lic. Though it would be a seri­ous crunch to com­plete the entire chal­lenge in the cold morn­ings and ear­ly evenings of Octo­ber, it’s a good time of the year to at least knock out a few thanks to the crisp col­ors that define the landscape.

Novem­ber — Explore Underground
Mam­moth Caves Nation­al Park, Kentucky
Any­time of the year is a great time to explore the under­ground labyrinths of Mam­moth Cave Nation­al Park in Ken­tucky. There is a lot to see with near­ly 400 miles of the cave mapped out. Thanks to its sub­ter­ranean sta­tus, the inside of Mam­moth Cave hov­ers around 54° through­out the year. The only way to expe­ri­ence the under­ground is on a guid­ed tour led by a park ranger of which there are many to choose from through­out the day.

Decem­ber- Go Hut-to-Hut
10th Moun­tain Divi­sion Huts, Colorado 
There is no bet­ter way to spend your Decem­ber than in the com­fort­able con­fines of the 10th Moun­tain Divi­sion Huts in Col­orado. Sur­round­ed by pic­turesque Rocky Moun­tain hori­zons, the 34 dif­fer­ent back­coun­try huts oper­at­ed by the 10th Moun­tain Divi­sion wel­come year-round recre­ation. Come win­ter, it’s a true par­adise of snow with over 350 miles of sug­gest­ed cross-coun­try ski and snow­shoe routes to explore. The only way to ensure an overnight stay in the win­ter sea­son is through lot­tery forms, which are due by Feb­ru­ary 15th.

 


 

San Luis Obispo County’s (SLO CAL) stunning scenery is best taken in slowly. Whether you prefer to take in the sights on foot or in the saddle, SLO CAL has no shortage of opportunities for every experience level.

 

SLO CAL’s abun­dant hik­ing trails pro­vide end­less oppor­tu­ni­ty for expe­ri­enc­ing the land­scape up close. The rolling hills are a vibrant green in spring, and turn to gold in the sum­mer. A chain of vol­canic peaks, known as the 9 sis­ters, tran­sect SLO CAL’s most promi­nent val­ley and paint a strik­ing land­scape from San Luis Obis­po to Mor­ro Bay. Many of them have well-kept trails and we high­ly rec­om­mend you take advan­tage of the bird’s eye view! 

For south-coun­ty hik­ers that want to gain some ele­va­tion and ocean views, you can’t beat the Avi­la Ridge trail or the new­ly-opened Pis­mo Pre­serve. Avi­la Ridge starts in Shell Beach and climbs the tow­er­ing oak-filled hill­side that sep­a­rates the small beach towns. For those will­ing to make the trip to the peak, the tree swing at the top will make you feel like you’re swing­ing on the edge of the world. The Pis­mo Pre­serve to the south offers hikes that will take you through some of the most pris­tine coastal hill­sides. While it’s cur­rent­ly only acces­si­ble with a guide, the expe­ri­ence  is well worth it and expect­ed to be open-access in the near future.

If moun­tain bik­ing is more your style, you’re in luck. SLO CAL is home of some of the most awe-inspir­ing sea-side moun­tain bik­ing trails in the coun­try. Take a dri­ve just south of Los Osos & Bay­wood Park to Mon­taña de Oro State Park and you’ll find your­self climb­ing hills of sage and descend­ing with sweep­ing views of dra­mat­ic seas. The mel­low bluff-top trails pro­vide great options for begin­ners and those seek­ing an up-close view of the crash­ing tides below. Pack a lunch, you’ll have a hard time tear­ing your­self away from this dreamy single-track.

Adja­cent to Mon­taña de Oro is Mor­ro Bay’s South Jet­ty. The long sand­spit is home to oth­er-world­ly dunes and is a must-see if you’ve nev­er had the expe­ri­ence. Sev­er­al trails wind between the bay and the sea and are acces­si­ble only by foot or kayak. This human-pow­ered expe­ri­ence is one you won’t for­get any­time soon.

Of course there are more than enough impromp­tu-oppor­tu­ni­ties to stretch your legs and enjoy the SLO CAL beau­ty. The north coast of High­way One is flush with all-access board­walks. Pull off near the famous Piedra Blan­cas Light Sta­tion and take a walk around the 19th cen­tu­ry grounds, or make a stop just north of Cam­bria at the Fis­call­i­ni Ranch Pre­serve. The untouched bluffs and drift­wood sculp­tures offer a unique view of the entire coastline.

Wher­ev­er the trail takes you, from the hill­tops to the sea, we’re sure you’ll find what you’re look­ing for. 

 

G e t t i n g    T h e r e
Now with direct flights from Den­ver, San Fran­cis­co, Seat­tle, Los Ange­les and Phoenix, get­ting to SLO CAL is eas­i­er than ever. Come stay and hang out, we dare you to get bored in this explorer’s paradise.


You may have come to San Luis Obispo County (SLO CAL) for the adventure, but you’ll want to stay for the moments in between. With plenty of room to wander, the seemingly-endless possibilities will make for an unforgettable experience.

F r e e   T o   R o a m
Along­side all of the adven­ture offer­ings, this area is also a bustling hub for food, cul­ture, and much more. We’ve put togeth­er an insid­er guide for those moments in between your morn­ing hike and your sun­set surf.

Start your day in the town of San Luis Obis­po by bik­ing to one of the many local cof­fee shops. Grab a lat­te, hang out, or walk through SLO’s his­toric down­town before head­ing out for the day’s adven­ture, you’ll leave know­ing why this town was recent­ly named one of “America’s Hap­pi­est Cities.”

The 240-year-old creek­side  Mis­sion San Luis Obis­po de Tolosa that SLO is built around is a promi­nent land­mark, and seeps cul­ture into the sur­round­ing area. The span­ish-style white-washed build­ings and tow­er­ing cam­phor trees that line the road­ways make for a pic­turesque scene in the his­toric streets. 


The same great weath­er is large­ly respon­si­ble for the coun­ty’s live­ly food scene. The deep agri­cul­tur­al roots are evi­dent in the vast open spaces with graz­ing cat­tle, road-side farms, and award-win­ning winer­ies that blan­ket the region. Start your tour up in Paso Rob­les – the coun­ty’s bur­geon­ing wine hub which rivaled Napa Val­ley in wine pro­duc­tion last year –and spend your day ram­bling down the 101.

From there, cruise on down to Tem­ple­ton, where his­toric store­fronts are brim­ming with fresh cui­sine and local liba­tions. Keep mov­ing south to the Avi­la Val­ley Barn, a region­al hotspot. Their farm­stand offers a boun­ty of fruits and veg­eta­bles grown on the prop­er­ty and there is always a line for their fresh-baked pies. After you’ve eat­en your fill, head out for a stroll at the near-by Bob Jones Trail, which runs through the val­ley to the coast, mak­ing for a relax­ing jaunt any­time of the day.

The Vil­lage of Arroyo Grande is a must-see if you find your­self roam­ing a lit­tle fur­ther south. With roost­ers wan­der­ing the streets that are lined with local­ly owned shops and restau­rants, you’ll find your­self steeped in small-town charm. No mat­ter where the road takes you, there’s almost cer­tain­ly some­thing fresh await­ing your arrival. Take it from us, you won’t want to miss your chance to take advan­tage of the local flavors.

We can’t think of a bet­ter way to end a day of adven­tur­ing than with a stop by the Madon­na Inn. The flashy inte­ri­or and sig­na­ture pink is a sight worth see­ing. Grab a piece of their famous cake and spend the evening plan­ning tomorrow’s escapades.

G e
t ti n g    T h e r e
Now with direct flights from Den­ver, San Fran­cis­co, Seat­tle, and more, get­ting to SLO CAL is eas­i­er than ever. Come stay and hang out, we dare you to get bored in this explorer’s paradise.


dupont

Out­door lovers tend to think of nation­al lands first for their pur­suits, but state parks can pro­vide as much action as you can han­dle, regard­less of sport. So next time you’re think­ing of head­ing to a Nation­al Park or For­est, plug “State” into your brows­er and see what adven­tures come up.

denali state parkDay Hik­ing

Denali State Park, Alaska
A walk in the woods is the most obvi­ous way to spend time in a state park, but Alas­ka takes it to the next lev­el in Denali State Park. The mas­sive park is 325,000 acres (about half the size of Rhode Island) and boasts three lengthy back­pack­ing trails. In just a day though, you can hike the Cas­cade trail from Byers Lake to K’esugi Ridge for stun­ning above tree­line views of Mount Denali.

State For­est State Park, Colorado
Rugged and real in the Rocky Moun­tains, State For­est State Park is as Col­orado as any of its more famous brethren. For a short, but gor­geous hike take the one mile trail to Lake Agnes and the crag­gy peaks which rise above it. If you need more to stretch your legs, the thir­teen mile round trip to crys­tal Kel­ly Lake will wear you out in a day.

Na Pali coast state parkBack­pack­ing

Nā Pali Coast State Park, Hawaii
Four thou­sand foot cliffs, lush trop­i­cal scenery, gor­geous beach­es, his­toric stone wall terraces—and the only way to expe­ri­ence it by land is on the Kalalau Trail. The first two miles can be done as a day hike, but to see it all get one of the lim­it­ed camp­ing per­mits for the eleven mile trek which ends at the sheer cliffs of Kalalau Beach.

Jay Cooke State Park, Minnesota
Just out­side Duluth lies Jay Cooke State Park on the dra­mat­ic St Louis Riv­er gorge. With its tight­ly wound fifty miles of trail, plen­ty of day hik­ing abounds, but to esca­late your scenery and soli­tude head out to one of its back­coun­try camps, like Sil­ver Creek, Lost Lake or High Land­ing. These are ide­al base­camps to fol­low the Spruce and High trails through hard­wood forests to the far-flung and breath­tak­ing canyon view­point at the east end of the park.

Green River GorgePad­dling

Kanaskat-Palmer State Park/Flaming Geyser State Park, Washington
The North­west is a pad­dling par­adise and one of its most epic runs is in the Green Riv­er Gorge from the put in at Kanaskat-Palmer to the fin­ish at Flam­ing Geyser. This Class IV pad­dle is for the expe­ri­enced only, and takes you twelve miles through the gor­geous high-walled, moss-cov­ered canyon.

Cad­do Lake State Park, Texas
Texas may not be known for its water sports, but Cad­do Lake, the state’s largest nat­ur­al fresh­wa­ter body, pro­vides 50 miles of water trails to canoe and kayak through a maze of cypress trees draped in Span­ish Moss in its bay­ous. Alli­ga­tors, along with tur­tles, snakes, beavers, and white-tailed deer, roam these waters so keep your hands in the boat and your eyes peeled.

dupontMoun­tain Biking

Sil­ver Falls State Park, Oregon
Named after its abun­dance of water­falls, this park also home to a num­ber of mul­ti-use trails which have been pop­u­lar with moun­tain bik­ers for years. Its newest trails though are pur­pose built by bik­ers for bik­ers. The Cata­mount trail will send you on a berm and turn filled descent through clas­sic West­ern Ore­gon ever­green for­est with enough rocky, tech­ni­cal fea­tures to require your game face to be on the whole ride.

Dupont State For­est Recre­ation­al Area, North Carolina
A slick rock mec­ca in North Car­oli­na? Absolute­ly, many of the near­ly hun­dred miles of moun­tain bike trails weave through pine forests on gran­ite domes, that have been favor­ably com­pared to Moab. A high­ly rec­om­mend­ed route is start­ing on the Corn Mills Shoals trail and fol­low­ing a num­ber of short trails (and there are many) includ­ing Bridal Veil and Lit­tle Riv­er, to fin­ish with a steep down­hill from Burnt Mountain.

baxter state parkPeak Bag­ging

Bax­ter State Park, Maine
You’ve heard of Mount Kah­tadin, it’s the north­ern ter­mi­nus of the Appalachi­an trail, but did you know it resides in a state park? With numer­ous routes up and down, all of which are extreme­ly phys­i­cal­ly tax­ing, the Hunt Trail is the most pop­u­lar due to its scenery. For the most intense route take the Knife’s Edge, but watch your step.


We’re partnering with SLO CAL to bring you insider knowledge on this off the beaten path adventure destination. We’ll make sure you know exactly 
what to do and where to go once you get there.

 

Locat­ed in the heart of California’s Cen­tral Coast, SLO CAL is a hid­den gem on California’s coast­line just wait­ing to be dis­cov­ered. From pris­tine beach­es with pump­ing surf to oak-strewn hill­sides, SLO CAL has some­thing for the adven­tur­er in all of us.

G o    C o a s t a l 
These rugged shores are dot­ted with end­less coves, full of oppor­tu­ni­ties to explore. From Ragged Point to Pis­mo Beach, each unique town is ripe with its own local fla­vor. May the surf­ing, pad­dle board­ing, and kayak­ing commence.


Start your jour­ney of SLO CAL on the intre­pid North Coast. At the south end of the Big Sur coast­line, Ragged Point looms large above the Pacif­ic Ocean, offer­ing sweep­ing vis­tas and incred­i­ble panora­mas of California’s Cen­tral Coast. Sip a cap­puc­ci­no from the cliff-side cof­fee shop while admir­ing the lush gar­dens and some of Cal­i­for­ni­a’s most strik­ing scenery. 

Head south down to San Sime­on on the icon­ic High­way 1 Dis­cov­ery Route, which spans miles of gor­geous coun­try through­out the area. Turn your sites to the many sandy beach coves along the way as this region is pop­u­lar with the local ele­phant seals sun­bathing along the coastal area known as Piedras Blan­cas. If you’re feel­ing ambi­tious, head out for a kitesurf if the wind is right. 


As you wind your way down the coast, you’ll find the famous Hearst Cas­tle, a
lux­u­ri­ous hill­top man­sion that looks out over the Pacif­ic and boasts a gold gild­ed swim­ming pool and a herd of zebras. Stop for a tour or keep head­ing down to Cayu­cos, a small town with authen­tic local fla­vor, and the per­fect spot to grab some fresh-caught seafood and hang near the beach. 


Mor­ro Bay
is a great stop on your jour­ney and the per­fect place to take part in some beach-side escapades. A seafarer’s won­der­land, you won’t want to miss the oppor­tu­ni­ty for some stand-up pad­dle board­ing with amaz­ing views of the awe-inspir­ing Mor­ro Rock or take a jaunt on one of the many board­walks.

After a full day of coastal activ­i­ties, we can’t think of a bet­ter place to spend the gold­en hour than over­look­ing the ocean. Take a kayak trip around Shell Beach through the tow­er­ing Dinosaur Caves or take advan­tage of the sea­son­al swells and head down to Pis­mo Beach for a sun­set surf ses­sion at the pier. If you’re feel­ing a lit­tle more leisure­ly, set sail on an evening tour of Port San Luis from Avi­la Beach. The area is as rich in local his­to­ry as it is in whales and oth­er marine life.

Either way, make sure you don’t miss the spec­tac­u­lar sun­sets that spoil the area year round. We promise, after spend­ing the day tak­ing in the small arti­san towns and charm­ing sea­side vil­lages, you’ll end your day wish­ing you’d nev­er have to leave.

G e t t i n g    T h e r e
Now with direct flights from Den­ver, San Fran­cis­co, Seat­tle, and more, get­ting to SLO CAL is eas­i­er than ever. Come stay and hang out, we dare you to get bored in this explorer’s paradise.


Exalt­ed as a play­ground for the fit and brave, Utah’s desert gem, Moab, sits beside the Col­orado Riv­er, two nation­al parks, and a state park. Mean­ing “Promised Land,” the destination’s nomen­cla­ture denotes its unri­valed access to canyons, trails, river­ways, and rock walls. But to the dis­cern­ing eye, Moab’s oth­er­world­ly landscapes—think icon­ic red rock for­ma­tions back­dropped against snow-capped peaks—are more than an adren­a­line gate­way. They’re also the per­fect stage for bud­ding photographers.

The Clymb and Hud­son Hen­ry, a bonafide go-any­where, try-any­thing adven­tur­er, and cel­e­brat­ed trav­el pho­tog­ra­ph­er whose work has been rec­og­nized by Nation­al Geo­graph­ic, have joined forces to offer a five-day pho­to adven­ture. This fall, join Hud­son in Moab for a hands-on work­shop designed for any­one who wants to devel­op their cre­ative vision, best uti­lize the gear they already have, and learn tac­tics to bet­ter tell their own trav­el sto­riesinclud­ing advanced tech­niques like nightscapes and panoram­ic merg­ers. We first met Hud­son when we wrote about An Amer­i­can Ascent, an award-win­ning film for which he direct­ed photography.

We chat­ted up Hud­son about his pas­sion for teach­ing and love of Moab:

THE CLYMB: WHAT FIRST GOT YOU INTO ADVENTURE PHOTOGRAPHY? WERE YOU A TRAVELER OR PHOTOGRAPHER FIRST?

HUDSON HENRY: It’s always been about trav­el­ing and tak­ing adven­tures to wild and beau­ti­ful places and bring­ing back sto­ries to share with fam­i­ly and friends, and then from there it grew into a wider audience.

THE CLYMB: AND FROM THERE YOU PROGRESSED INTO TEACHING?

HUDSON HENRY: I’ve always been about shar­ing the adven­ture, bring­ing back visu­al sto­ries to share with oth­ers of places they would oth­er­wise nev­er see. It start­ed with show­ing my 90-year old grand­moth­er what it’s like to climb Kil­i­man­jaro. Over time my pas­sion evolved into shar­ing adven­tures with oth­ers while teach­ing them to cap­ture their own visu­al sto­ries. I get a lot of sat­is­fac­tion from “ah-ha!” moments when some­thing clicks for a student.

THE CLYMB: WHY MOAB? WHAT MAKES IT A GREAT ADVENTURE PHOTOGRAPHY LOCATION? 

HUDSON HENRY: It has real­ly good weath­er and the high desert environment—it’s ridicu­lous­ly scenic. All these shoot­ing locations—Fisher Tow­ers, Arch­es, Bal­anced Rock—they’re just a hop, skip, and jump from this com­fort­able lit­tle town with all these fun restau­rants and ameni­ties. And the lack of light pol­lu­tion gives real­ly good abil­i­ty to do stuff with stars.

THE CLYMB: WHO SHOULD ATTEND THIS WORKSHOP?

HUDSON HENRY: It’s for any­one who loves a good adven­ture and wants to bring home bet­ter pic­tures to share. This work­shop is great for any lev­el of pho­tog­ra­ph­er who is into shoot­ing action, wildlife, and land­scapes to tell a good sto­ry about a place and cap­ture the essence of a trip. I lim­it my work­shops to small groups and they tend to be all along the spec­trum from peo­ple who are just get­ting start­ed to those who are refin­ing advanced tech­niques. The goals of the work­shop are to devel­op your own cre­ative vision, to bet­ter use the gear you already have, and inter­act with each oth­er, maybe even form friend­ships that last beyond the workshop.

THE CLYMB: YOU’VE HAD GREAT SUCCESS WITH HIGHLY TECHNICAL PHOTOGRAPHY METHODS. WHAT ARE YOU TACKLING NEXT?

HUDSON HENRY: I am work­ing on a book about advanced panoram­ic pho­tog­ra­phy. I’m exper­i­ment­ing with under­wa­ter pho­tog­ra­phy with kite­board­ing and light­ing tech­niques. Also, time laps­es of stars mov­ing through the sky. I’m work­ing on the holy grail of time lapse: fol­low­ing the sun­set through the Milky Way back to sun­rise. And video and drone stuff. I’ll have a drone at the workshop.

THE CLYMB: IF YOU COULD GIVE ONE PIECE OF ADVICE TO ASPIRING ADVENTURE PHOTOGRAPHERS, WHAT WOULD IT BE?

HUDSON HENRY: The thing that dri­ves me is look­ing at pho­tog­ra­phers bet­ter than me—Sebastião Sal­ga­do is a favorite. There’s con­stant­ly room to improve. Every year you should be improv­ing. It’s more about cre­ative­ly find­ing ways to com­pose your images and using light than the lat­est and great­est equipment.

Get hands-on train­ing and explore Moab with Hud­son. Learn more about this exclu­sive five-day adven­ture pho­to work­shop.

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His­tor­i­cal­ly, many of the great female ath­letes, adven­tur­ers, and out­door indus­try pio­neers were not always able to claim the title of both moth­er and ath­lete. Before the Indus­tri­al Rev­o­lu­tion a woman had to choose between a life of adven­ture and great ath­let­ic suc­cess, or a life where she would be able to have a family.

Even as our times and tech­nol­o­gy have pro­gressed, and oppor­tu­ni­ties for train­ing and trav­el­ing have become more acces­si­ble for men and women alike, it can still be very dif­fi­cult to raise a child and pur­sue phys­i­cal and geo­graph­ic extremes. This arti­cle high­lights a few amaz­ing women who have been able to be not only moth­ers, but also amaz­ing pio­neers for the outdoors.

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Lynn Hill – Rock climber

Indis­putably a liv­ing leg­end, Lynn Hill has been a pio­neer in the sport of rock climb­ing and one of its great­est celebri­ties since the 1980s. She has accom­plished many feats dur­ing her career: she was the first per­son to make a free ascent of The Nose on El Cap­i­tan in the Yosemite Val­ley, and has numer­ous 5.14s under her belt as well as first ascents on sev­er­al continents.

Lynn always want­ed to have a child, but because of the fast-paced and stren­u­ous nature of her career, it took until she was 42 for it to hap­pen. Preg­nan­cy and hav­ing a child changed her rela­tion­ship to her sport; with par­ent­hood, and a pas­sion­ate pur­suit that took her all over the world, she found more of a need for bal­ance and security.

“For me it has been quite a jug­gling act to man­age all the demands on my time in both my per­son­al and pub­lic life. But like climb­ing itself, the most chal­leng­ing expe­ri­ences are usu­al­ly the most sat­is­fy­ing. Moth­er­hood is cer­tain­ly more chal­leng­ing than any climb I’ve done, but there’s noth­ing greater than the sense of love I feel for my child.”

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Junko Tabei – First woman to sum­mit Everest

Junko Tabei was the first woman to sum­mit Mount Everest.

“Back in 1970s Japan, it was still wide­ly con­sid­ered that men were the ones to work out­side and women would stay at home…We were told we should be rais­ing chil­dren instead.”

Junko was 35 when she sum­mit­ed Mount Ever­est with a 15-per­son, all-women Japan­ese team. She was able to leave her 3‑year-old child in the hands of her hus­band and fam­i­ly mem­bers in order to accom­plish this feat.

Her ascent was a man­i­fes­ta­tion of her extreme deter­mi­na­tion and was also a sym­bol to many of the great strides for­ward that women of the era were mak­ing towards equal­i­ty and autonomy.

GertBoyle_02

Gert Boyle – Pres­i­dent turned Chair­woman of Colum­bia Sportswear

When her hus­band died in 1970, Gert Boyle found her­self at the helm of Colum­bia Sports­wear, with lit­tle to no busi­ness expe­ri­ence. Gert turned a finan­cial­ly strug­gling sports­wear com­pa­ny into the behe­moth out­door indus­try that it is today. She spent 1970–1998 as Pres­i­dent, enlist­ing the help of her son and oth­er fam­i­ly mem­bers to help cre­ate her vision for the business.

One of the major turn­ing points for the com­pa­ny was its clever add cam­paigns that fea­tured Gert.

“We start­ed adver­tis­ing in 1984 with the Tough Moth­er cam­paign. In one, I put my son, Tim, through the car wash and said, ‘‘That’s the way we test our gar­ments.’ Sales shot up. Tim took over as CEO in 1989.”

Through grit and tenac­i­ty, Gert chart­ed the course for the suc­cess of her com­pa­ny and the secu­ri­ty of her fam­i­ly. Talk about One Tough Moth­er (which is the title of her book)!

Dur­ing the cold­er months of the year, it can be tough to gar­ner the strength to head out­doors for a win­ter adven­ture, but for those look­ing to brave the cold while also hop­ing to par­take in a more relax­ing form of out­door adven­ture, hot springs are what you need. Here’s a short list of some stuff you might want to bring along.

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Water Bot­tle
This could be an easy one to for­get since you’re lit­er­al­ly head­ing to a body of water, but mak­ing sure to bring a water bot­tle is often times eas­i­er said than done. Plus don’t for­get you can’t drink the water at most hot springs, not that you’d want to since it’s pip­ping hot, so make sure to pack in water. And if it’s allowed it’s always nice to have a few cold ones while you and your friends soak.

San­dals
Maybe you’re trekking into a hot spring from far out, or maybe it’s snowy, but once you get there you’ll be glad you brought some extra footwear. Many hot springs are often out in the woods and the pools have been built into exist­ing rock struc­tures, where the ground can be unsta­ble, rocks can be sharp, and you nev­er know what you’re gonna get.  It can be nice to have some extra footwear to slip into for soaking.

Head­lamp
If you’re head­ing out dur­ing the win­ter months you’ll know that the sun tends to set pret­ty ear­ly dur­ing this time of year. The last thing you want is to be hik­ing all the way back out to the trail­head in the pitch black. Bring a headlamp.

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Bathing Suit (option­al)
Poten­tial­ly the most impor­tant item for your soak­ing expe­ri­ence. Sure there’s a hand­ful of the soak­ing hot springs out there that are cloth­ing option­al, but hey let’s be hon­est that isn’t for most of us. You’ll prob­a­bly want a bathing suit, so bring a bathing suit.

Blue­tooth Speaker
This is a “use at your own judg­ment” rec­om­men­da­tion. Chances are if you’re going out to pop­u­lar hot springs and there are a lot of peo­ple around they might not want to hear your tunes. Be polite, ask first, and respect oth­ers. With that being said, there’s no harm in break­ing out the jams when the time is right.

Back­pack
Prefer­ably a day­pack, but if you’re going for a long dis­tance hike to some springs you’ll obvi­ous­ly want a back­pack­ers bag. The trusty back­pack is the surest way to remem­ber that you don’t for­get all your oth­er essen­tials, water bot­tle, tow­el, bathing suit, you name it.

Tow­el
Nobody wants to stand around in the freez­ing cold wait­ing to air dry, make sure to pack your tow­el so the sec­ond you get out you can get warm and dry.

For out­door enthu­si­asts and ath­letes, injury is avoid­able but, often, inevitable. Whether it’s a major injury that side­lines you for an entire sea­son or some­thing minor that takes you out of the game for a few weeks, it can be tough to keep an upbeat mind­set when you can’t do what you love. Wan­na beat the injury blues and return to your sport full-force? Here’s how.

©istockphoto/gremlin

Don’t Neglect Phys­i­cal Therapy
Depend­ing on the injury, you may be pre­scribed a round of phys­i­cal ther­a­py. Take advan­tage of this won­der­ful resource. Think of it as essen­tial­ly hav­ing your very own per­son­al train­er, only they’re train­ing your body to heal instead of per­form­ing. If your PT is worth their salt, the per­for­mance aspect will come lat­er as you start to progress and build strength.

Can’t afford a ton of PT ses­sions or your insur­ance lim­its your num­ber of vis­its? That’s okay. Many of the exer­cis­es your PT will have you do can be done at home or at your gym. Be straight with them by say­ing you can only come once a week or once every two weeks, then ask for work­sheets and plans to do on your own. They’ll under­stand and they’ll hold you accountable.

Swim. Seri­ous­ly, Swim Like It’s Your Job
Par­tic­u­lar­ly ther­a­peu­tic for knee injuries, swim­ming is the per­fect low-impact car­dio­vas­cu­lar work­out. Clear it with your doc­tor and phys­i­cal ther­a­pist first, then buy some gog­gles and get going.

Not sure where to find a local lap pool? Check out your local recre­ation­al cen­ters. They typ­i­cal­ly have lap swim and their prices (for res­i­dents) are usu­al­ly much low­er than more high-end gyms.

Go on Adven­tures (Even If You Can’t Ful­ly Participate)
An irri­tat­ed ten­don in your hand from climb­ing? Torn ACL after an epic ski week­end? Shin splints after a big race? It hap­pens. If you’re out of the game for a bit, that doesn’t mean you have to stop attend­ing events or social­iz­ing. In fact, con­tin­u­ing to hang with your out­doorsy friends is good for your men­tal health and will help you to cope.

Friends going away for a ski week­end? While they’re on the slopes, hit the mas­sage par­lor and hole up in a cozy cof­fee shop. Maybe meet them for drinks on the moun­tain. Just because your body can’t do what you’re used to it doing doesn’t mean you have to become invalid. Get out and explore all there is to do when you’re not obses­sive­ly prac­tic­ing your sport.

Lis­ten to Your Body First
If you have a major injury, every­one will have advice for you. Your doc­tor, your best friend, your dirt­bag bud­dies, the dude on the street who notices you have a limp. While well-mean­ing, these peo­ple are not you. Their advice may be good gen­er­al­ly speak­ing but, in the end, all injuries are unique.

That being said, lis­ten to your body, your doc­tor, and your phys­i­cal ther­a­pist first. You’ll notice that lis­ten­ing to your body comes before your doc­tor or PT. You know your­self and your body bet­ter than any­one. If you think you need more rest, a dif­fer­ent treat­ment, or that you’re ready to go hard­er, then rest it, seek it, do it. That being said, remem­ber that your doc­tor and your PT are pro­fes­sion­als, com­mit­ted to get­ting you the best care they can give.

Your body is smart and mirac­u­lous. It knows what it needs. Pay atten­tion to it.

Con­sid­er Alter­na­tive Medicine
Mod­ern med­i­cine is amaz­ing. Ortho­pe­dic sur­geons, podi­a­trists, and a vari­ety of spe­cial­ists have so much to offer. You should 100 per­cent be con­sult­ing with a spe­cial­ist, par­tic­u­lar­ly if you have a major injury. How­ev­er, sup­ple­ment­ing your care with less tra­di­tion­al meth­ods may be a good choice for you.

Con­sid­er acupunc­ture, mas­sage, or reflex­ol­o­gy as an alter­na­tive treat­ment. You may even want to con­sult a herbal­ist to see what foods, herbs, and vit­a­mins can help your heal­ing process.

You may have come to San Luis Obispo County (SLO CAL) for the adventure, but you’ll want to stay for the moments in between. With plenty of room to wander, the seemingly-endless possibilities will make for an unforgettable experience.

F r e e   T o   R o a m
Along­side all of the adven­ture offer­ings, this area is also a bustling hub for food, cul­ture, and much more. We’ve put togeth­er an insid­er guide for those moments in between your morn­ing hike and your sun­set surf.

Start your day in the town of San Luis Obis­po by bik­ing to one of the many local cof­fee shops. Grab a lat­te, hang out, or walk through SLO’s his­toric down­town before head­ing out for the day’s adven­ture, you’ll leave know­ing why this town was recent­ly named one of “America’s Hap­pi­est Cities.”

The 240-year-old creek­side  Mis­sion San Luis Obis­po de Tolosa that SLO is built around is a promi­nent land­mark, and seeps cul­ture into the sur­round­ing area. The span­ish-style white-washed build­ings and tow­er­ing cam­phor trees that line the road­ways make for a pic­turesque scene in the his­toric streets. 


The same great weath­er is large­ly respon­si­ble for the coun­ty’s live­ly food scene. The deep agri­cul­tur­al roots are evi­dent in the vast open spaces with graz­ing cat­tle, road-side farms, and award-win­ning winer­ies that blan­ket the region. Start your tour up in Paso Rob­les – the coun­ty’s bur­geon­ing wine hub which rivaled Napa Val­ley in wine pro­duc­tion last year –and spend your day ram­bling down the 101.

From there, cruise on down to Tem­ple­ton, where his­toric store­fronts are brim­ming with fresh cui­sine and local liba­tions. Keep mov­ing south to the Avi­la Val­ley Barn, a region­al hotspot. Their farm­stand offers a boun­ty of fruits and veg­eta­bles grown on the prop­er­ty and there is always a line for their fresh-baked pies. After you’ve eat­en your fill, head out for a stroll at the near-by Bob Jones Trail, which runs through the val­ley to the coast, mak­ing for a relax­ing jaunt any­time of the day.

The Vil­lage of Arroyo Grande is a must-see if you find your­self roam­ing a lit­tle fur­ther south. With roost­ers wan­der­ing the streets that are lined with local­ly owned shops and restau­rants, you’ll find your­self steeped in small-town charm. No mat­ter where the road takes you, there’s almost cer­tain­ly some­thing fresh await­ing your arrival. Take it from us, you won’t want to miss your chance to take advan­tage of the local flavors.

We can’t think of a bet­ter way to end a day of adven­tur­ing than with a stop by the Madon­na Inn. The flashy inte­ri­or and sig­na­ture pink is a sight worth see­ing. Grab a piece of their famous cake and spend the evening plan­ning tomorrow’s escapades.

G e
t ti n g    T h e r e
Now with direct flights from Den­ver, San Fran­cis­co, Seat­tle, and more, get­ting to SLO CAL is eas­i­er than ever. Come stay and hang out, we dare you to get bored in this explorer’s paradise.


Ecuador

In the film Butch Cas­sidy and the Sun­dance Kid, Cas­sidy was onto some­thing when he said, “Kid, next time I say, ‘Let’s go some­place like Bolivia,’ let’s GO some­place like Bolivia.” South America’s misty moun­tains, desert dream­scapes, impos­si­bly blue waters, and wild jun­gles still haunt the adven­tur­ous among us, espe­cial­ly since the region is slid­ing into spring right when the north­ern hemisphere’s set­tling into deep freeze. Ready to book a tick­et for way south of the bor­der? Here’s our adven­ture buck­et list.


Ecuador

Moun­tain Bik­ing Ecuador’s the Avenue of Volcanoes
If the thought of freerid­ing vol­canic ash and hard­ened lava down a Volcano’s shoul­der doesn’t get your blood pump­ing, the views of Lake Quilotoa’s crater full of emer­ald water and the hulk­ing chain of vol­ca­noes from Chimb­o­ra­zo to Cotopaxi should do it. Ecuador boasts one of the high­est per­cent­ages of pro­tect­ed lands, one of the world’s high­est active vol­ca­noes, and friend­ly locals, too. If wildlife is your thing, book a flight out to the Gala­pa­gos while you’re there, too, and kayak along­side tor­tois­es and more types of birds than you can imag­ine pos­si­ble in one place.


Patagonia

Trekking Tor­res del Paine Nation­al Park, Chilean Patagonia
To behold in per­son the strik­ing spires of Tor­res del Paine might be enough to moti­vate a five-day trek. But they’re far from the only rea­son to hike in the park. Patagonia’s laud­ed as one of the most untouched, uncon­t­a­m­i­nat­ed places on Earth, and a tour of its glow­ing blue glac­i­ers, cerulean alpine lakes, water­falls, and pris­tine forests doesn’t dis­ap­point. Stay in a hos­pitable Refu­gio if camp­ing isn’t your thing. And if you’re a climber, be sure to vis­it the alpine Mec­ca of El Chalten.


Brazil

Pad­dling Brazil’s Bay of Paraty
The Bay of Paraty’s crys­talline green-blue water feels as good as it looks. Calm, warm cur­rents wel­come begin­ning pad­dlers, and plen­ty of shops rent stand-up pad­dle­boards and sea kayaks. Islands dot the bay, call­ing for explo­ration, and live­ly under­wa­ter ecosys­tems await swim­mers, snorkel­ers, and divers, as well. Plus the town of Paraty’s charm­ing cob­ble­stone streets, his­toric church­es, and roman­tic restau­rants eas­i­ly fill up rest-days when surf­ing or bask­ing on the beach is just too much to handle.


Peru

Trekking to Machu Picchu
Trekking through Peru’s green vel­vet Andes can only be topped by step­ping through the Sun Gate at Machu Pic­chu as the first rays of day­light peek above the misty Peru­vian Andes onto the Incan ruins nes­tled into the moun­tain­top. The pop­u­lar Inca Trail winds up to Machu Pic­chu along the Urubam­ba Riv­er, one of the Amazon’s head­wa­ters, and stops by oth­er ruins along the way. Trekking it requires a per­mit and guide—but a vari­ety of oth­er trails offer less crowd­ed options. And after a few days of moun­tain trekking, the dream­i­ly land­scaped nat­ur­al hot springs at San­ta Tere­sa are paradise.


Chile

Ski­ing Por­tillo, Chile
If you dream of pow­der, even in the heat of sum­mer, you need to get down to Por­tillo. The old­est ski cen­ter in South Amer­i­ca, it’s also one of the purest ski des­ti­na­tions you can vis­it. Just 100 miles from San­ti­a­go, but 9,450 feet above sea lev­el, Por­tillo is pri­vate and pris­tine. No Guc­ci shops. No McDon­ald’s restau­rants. Just 2,500 feet of lift-ser­viced Andean per­fec­tion look­ing down on the gem-like blue-green Lagu­na del Inca. Por­tillo feels remote, but cer­tain­ly not unciv­i­lized. Frothy pis­co sours at the Por­tillo Bar and seduc­tive hot tubs pam­per skiers at day’s end.


Bolivia

Tour the Salar de Uyu­ni, Bolivia.
South­west­ern Bolivia might just trump the rest of the con­ti­nent for Pin­ter­est-wor­thy vaca­tion pho­tos. And pur­su­ing shots of the famous­ly pris­tine salt flats, blue-sky-mir­ror­ing lakes, and rich­ly col­ored Sal­vador Dali Desert is a wor­thy adven­ture all in itself. But if you lean toward masochism, load up a bicy­cle with camp­ing gear and as much water as you can car­ry to brave the lunar land­scape and infa­mous winds on a tour past the vibrant Lagu­na Col­orado and Lagu­na Verde, and through the rich­ly col­ored Sal­vador Dali Desert from Uyu­ni to San Pedro de Ata­ca­ma. Or hire a guide to take you out for a four-day Land Cruis­er tour.

National Geographic Road Atlas

It’s late at night and you’re dri­ving on a For­est Ser­vice road look­ing for the trail­head. You could find it if you had cell ser­vice, but you don’t because the whole point of the week­end trip was to get into a wild land where tech­nol­o­gy couldn’t reach you. Now’s the time you wish you could reach beneath your seat and pull out this adven­ture atlas from Nat­ty Geo.

With over 120 years of expe­ri­ence, Nation­al Geo­graph­ic is the ulti­mate advo­cate for explo­ration. And this handy 144-page, spi­ral bound atlas will help you find your way to where your adven­tures begin. The detailed maps of all 50 states, Cana­da, and Mex­i­co include scenic routes, his­toric sites, recre­ation info, and points of inter­est. It has a durable plas­tic out­er shell to shed cof­fee spills and can with­stand count­less shoves beneath the driver’s seat. 

This atlas makes the per­fect gift to unlock North Amer­i­ca for a friend or loved one and help them start exploring. 

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How many times have you said to your­self “I wish”? How many aspi­ra­tions in life do you push off, telling your­self “Some­day, maybe”? Or per­haps you’re the type who waits for per­fect con­di­tions to accom­plish, to relax, and to be happy.

Writer Bren­don Leonard shares his thoughts in this video cel­e­brat­ing the joys of life. Express­ing the neces­si­ty of sim­plic­i­ty and hap­pi­ness, Leonard com­mu­ni­cates the rel­a­tive insignif­i­cance of due dates, spread sheets, and bot­tom lines; while stress­ing the impor­tance of peo­ple, rela­tion­ships, and appre­ci­a­tion for the sim­ple things.

You have 29 thou­sand days to live your life. Instead of “I wish”, would­n’t you rather say “Damn, that was awesome”?

Check out this video for some per­spec­tive on what’s real­ly important.

Writ­ten by Alec Ross 

Get Hyped for sum­mer skate trips with the Sec­tor 9 team’s spot check of the Vol­com Broth­ers Skate Park in Mam­moth Lakes, Cal­i­for­nia. The 40,000 square-foot park is a par­adise for skate­board­ers and hosts a vari­ety of dif­fer­ent vert and street ter­rain, includ­ing nat­ur­al rock fea­tures that are also skate­able.

Best of all, the park is sur­round­ed by some amaz­ing places to set up camp, mak­ing the Vol­com Broth­ers Skatepark in Mam­moth Lakes a pre­mier des­ti­na­tion for your next skate adventure!

Image cour­tesy of Out­side magazine 

There you are: strik­ing a yoga pose to cel­e­brate claw­ing your way to the rim of a smol­der­ing vol­cano. No, wait. There you are: stomp­ing 1,000 miles through an untamed, pesti­lence-filled jun­gle with noth­ing but a GoPro and a bag of cel­e­bra­to­ry Cheez Doo­dles. No, no, no. You’re over there: rid­ing a camel through red Moroc­can sands, your neon-and-plaid but­ton-up shirt wrapped around your head to com­bat the beat­ing sun as you fight off maraud­ers with a hik­ing pole.

The folks at Out­side mag­a­zine don’t care about how many places you see your­self in your wildest adven­ture dreams. They just want to cel­e­brate the 35th anniver­sary of the pub­li­ca­tion by help­ing you make one of those dreams come true.

Your new best friends and tar­gets for bribery at Out­side are cur­rent­ly seek­ing pro­pos­als for the mag­a­zine’s first annu­al Adven­ture Grant—a $10,000 kick in the pants that will get one lucky win­ner out the door and into the cra­zi­est adven­ture he or she has ever dreamt of tackling.

Think your dream adven­ture is awe­some and fool­hardy enough to catch the edi­tors’ atten­tion? Exam­ples of the kinds of auda­cious mis­sions they’re look­ing for—taken from Out­side stories—include sail­ing a home­made raft down the Hud­son Riv­er, walk­ing a per­fect­ly straight line across Canada’s Prince Edward Island, and pad­dling a canoe from Port­land, Ore­gon, to Port­land, Maine. So no, your dream of final­ly bicy­cling to the gro­cery store isn’t going to cut it.

Want to be con­sid­ered? Fill out this sub­mis­sion form by May 18. You will be asked to sub­mit a video clip and short (500-word) essay as part of the process, which means you might want to start look­ing for some suck­ers to film and write for you.

You’ve spent your whole life read­ing Out­side and dream­ing of adven­ture. Time is run­ning out to have those dreams come true at the expense of the folks who’ve been taunt­ing you.

Good luck!