San Luis Obispo County’s (SLO CAL) stunning scenery is best taken in slowly. Whether you prefer to take in the sights on foot or in the saddle, SLO CAL has no shortage of opportunities for every experience level.

 

SLO CAL’s abun­dant hik­ing trails pro­vide end­less oppor­tu­ni­ty for expe­ri­enc­ing the land­scape up close. The rolling hills are a vibrant green in spring, and turn to gold in the sum­mer. A chain of vol­canic peaks, known as the 9 sis­ters, tran­sect SLO CAL’s most promi­nent val­ley and paint a strik­ing land­scape from San Luis Obis­po to Mor­ro Bay. Many of them have well-kept trails and we high­ly rec­om­mend you take advan­tage of the bird’s eye view! 

For south-coun­ty hik­ers that want to gain some ele­va­tion and ocean views, you can’t beat the Avi­la Ridge trail or the new­ly-opened Pis­mo Pre­serve. Avi­la Ridge starts in Shell Beach and climbs the tow­er­ing oak-filled hill­side that sep­a­rates the small beach towns. For those will­ing to make the trip to the peak, the tree swing at the top will make you feel like you’re swing­ing on the edge of the world. The Pis­mo Pre­serve to the south offers hikes that will take you through some of the most pris­tine coastal hill­sides. While it’s cur­rent­ly only acces­si­ble with a guide, the expe­ri­ence  is well worth it and expect­ed to be open-access in the near future.

If moun­tain bik­ing is more your style, you’re in luck. SLO CAL is home of some of the most awe-inspir­ing sea-side moun­tain bik­ing trails in the coun­try. Take a dri­ve just south of Los Osos & Bay­wood Park to Mon­taña de Oro State Park and you’ll find your­self climb­ing hills of sage and descend­ing with sweep­ing views of dra­mat­ic seas. The mel­low bluff-top trails pro­vide great options for begin­ners and those seek­ing an up-close view of the crash­ing tides below. Pack a lunch, you’ll have a hard time tear­ing your­self away from this dreamy single-track.

Adja­cent to Mon­taña de Oro is Mor­ro Bay’s South Jet­ty. The long sand­spit is home to oth­er-world­ly dunes and is a must-see if you’ve nev­er had the expe­ri­ence. Sev­er­al trails wind between the bay and the sea and are acces­si­ble only by foot or kayak. This human-pow­ered expe­ri­ence is one you won’t for­get any­time soon.

Of course there are more than enough impromp­tu-oppor­tu­ni­ties to stretch your legs and enjoy the SLO CAL beau­ty. The north coast of High­way One is flush with all-access board­walks. Pull off near the famous Piedra Blan­cas Light Sta­tion and take a walk around the 19th cen­tu­ry grounds, or make a stop just north of Cam­bria at the Fis­call­i­ni Ranch Pre­serve. The untouched bluffs and drift­wood sculp­tures offer a unique view of the entire coastline.

Wher­ev­er the trail takes you, from the hill­tops to the sea, we’re sure you’ll find what you’re look­ing for. 

 

G e t t i n g    T h e r e
Now with direct flights from Den­ver, San Fran­cis­co, Seat­tle, Los Ange­les and Phoenix, get­ting to SLO CAL is eas­i­er than ever. Come stay and hang out, we dare you to get bored in this explorer’s paradise.


You may have come to San Luis Obispo County (SLO CAL) for the adventure, but you’ll want to stay for the moments in between. With plenty of room to wander, the seemingly-endless possibilities will make for an unforgettable experience.

F r e e   T o   R o a m
Along­side all of the adven­ture offer­ings, this area is also a bustling hub for food, cul­ture, and much more. We’ve put togeth­er an insid­er guide for those moments in between your morn­ing hike and your sun­set surf.

Start your day in the town of San Luis Obis­po by bik­ing to one of the many local cof­fee shops. Grab a lat­te, hang out, or walk through SLO’s his­toric down­town before head­ing out for the day’s adven­ture, you’ll leave know­ing why this town was recent­ly named one of “America’s Hap­pi­est Cities.”

The 240-year-old creek­side  Mis­sion San Luis Obis­po de Tolosa that SLO is built around is a promi­nent land­mark, and seeps cul­ture into the sur­round­ing area. The span­ish-style white-washed build­ings and tow­er­ing cam­phor trees that line the road­ways make for a pic­turesque scene in the his­toric streets. 


The same great weath­er is large­ly respon­si­ble for the coun­ty’s live­ly food scene. The deep agri­cul­tur­al roots are evi­dent in the vast open spaces with graz­ing cat­tle, road-side farms, and award-win­ning winer­ies that blan­ket the region. Start your tour up in Paso Rob­les – the coun­ty’s bur­geon­ing wine hub which rivaled Napa Val­ley in wine pro­duc­tion last year –and spend your day ram­bling down the 101.

From there, cruise on down to Tem­ple­ton, where his­toric store­fronts are brim­ming with fresh cui­sine and local liba­tions. Keep mov­ing south to the Avi­la Val­ley Barn, a region­al hotspot. Their farm­stand offers a boun­ty of fruits and veg­eta­bles grown on the prop­er­ty and there is always a line for their fresh-baked pies. After you’ve eat­en your fill, head out for a stroll at the near-by Bob Jones Trail, which runs through the val­ley to the coast, mak­ing for a relax­ing jaunt any­time of the day.

The Vil­lage of Arroyo Grande is a must-see if you find your­self roam­ing a lit­tle fur­ther south. With roost­ers wan­der­ing the streets that are lined with local­ly owned shops and restau­rants, you’ll find your­self steeped in small-town charm. No mat­ter where the road takes you, there’s almost cer­tain­ly some­thing fresh await­ing your arrival. Take it from us, you won’t want to miss your chance to take advan­tage of the local flavors.

We can’t think of a bet­ter way to end a day of adven­tur­ing than with a stop by the Madon­na Inn. The flashy inte­ri­or and sig­na­ture pink is a sight worth see­ing. Grab a piece of their famous cake and spend the evening plan­ning tomorrow’s escapades.

G e
t ti n g    T h e r e
Now with direct flights from Den­ver, San Fran­cis­co, Seat­tle, and more, get­ting to SLO CAL is eas­i­er than ever. Come stay and hang out, we dare you to get bored in this explorer’s paradise.



We’re partnering with SLO CAL to bring you insider knowledge on this off the beaten path adventure destination. We’ll make sure you know exactly 
what to do and where to go once you get there.

 

Locat­ed in the heart of California’s Cen­tral Coast, SLO CAL is a hid­den gem on California’s coast­line just wait­ing to be dis­cov­ered. From pris­tine beach­es with pump­ing surf to oak-strewn hill­sides, SLO CAL has some­thing for the adven­tur­er in all of us.

G o    C o a s t a l 
These rugged shores are dot­ted with end­less coves, full of oppor­tu­ni­ties to explore. From Ragged Point to Pis­mo Beach, each unique town is ripe with its own local fla­vor. May the surf­ing, pad­dle board­ing, and kayak­ing commence.


Start your jour­ney of SLO CAL on the intre­pid North Coast. At the south end of the Big Sur coast­line, Ragged Point looms large above the Pacif­ic Ocean, offer­ing sweep­ing vis­tas and incred­i­ble panora­mas of California’s Cen­tral Coast. Sip a cap­puc­ci­no from the cliff-side cof­fee shop while admir­ing the lush gar­dens and some of Cal­i­for­ni­a’s most strik­ing scenery. 

Head south down to San Sime­on on the icon­ic High­way 1 Dis­cov­ery Route, which spans miles of gor­geous coun­try through­out the area. Turn your sites to the many sandy beach coves along the way as this region is pop­u­lar with the local ele­phant seals sun­bathing along the coastal area known as Piedras Blan­cas. If you’re feel­ing ambi­tious, head out for a kitesurf if the wind is right. 


As you wind your way down the coast, you’ll find the famous Hearst Cas­tle, a
lux­u­ri­ous hill­top man­sion that looks out over the Pacif­ic and boasts a gold gild­ed swim­ming pool and a herd of zebras. Stop for a tour or keep head­ing down to Cayu­cos, a small town with authen­tic local fla­vor, and the per­fect spot to grab some fresh-caught seafood and hang near the beach. 


Mor­ro Bay
is a great stop on your jour­ney and the per­fect place to take part in some beach-side escapades. A seafarer’s won­der­land, you won’t want to miss the oppor­tu­ni­ty for some stand-up pad­dle board­ing with amaz­ing views of the awe-inspir­ing Mor­ro Rock or take a jaunt on one of the many board­walks.

After a full day of coastal activ­i­ties, we can’t think of a bet­ter place to spend the gold­en hour than over­look­ing the ocean. Take a kayak trip around Shell Beach through the tow­er­ing Dinosaur Caves or take advan­tage of the sea­son­al swells and head down to Pis­mo Beach for a sun­set surf ses­sion at the pier. If you’re feel­ing a lit­tle more leisure­ly, set sail on an evening tour of Port San Luis from Avi­la Beach. The area is as rich in local his­to­ry as it is in whales and oth­er marine life.

Either way, make sure you don’t miss the spec­tac­u­lar sun­sets that spoil the area year round. We promise, after spend­ing the day tak­ing in the small arti­san towns and charm­ing sea­side vil­lages, you’ll end your day wish­ing you’d nev­er have to leave.

G e t t i n g    T h e r e
Now with direct flights from Den­ver, San Fran­cis­co, Seat­tle, and more, get­ting to SLO CAL is eas­i­er than ever. Come stay and hang out, we dare you to get bored in this explorer’s paradise.


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Root­ed in North­ern Cal­i­for­nia, among aged sequoia trees and the tow­er­ing cliffs of El Cap­i­tan, Last­ing Adven­tures is born and bred in the wilder­ness of Yosemite. This non-prof­it is on a mis­sion to serve youth in the out­doors, pro­vid­ing back­pack­ing trips, day hikes, and out­door sum­mer camps.

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Founder Scott Gehrman devel­oped an appre­ci­a­tion for Yosemite Nation­al Park at a young age when his bond with the park helped him recov­er after los­ing his moth­er to can­cer. This pas­sion grew into an inevitable call­ing to com­bine both his love for the out­doors and for youth devel­op­ment in order to estab­lish Last­ing Adven­tures in 1997.

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Yosemite is much more than a Nation­al Park to Last­ing Adven­tures. It is an emblem of love, edu­ca­tion, and per­se­ver­ance. It is an oppor­tu­ni­ty to show youth and the gen­er­al pub­lic the pos­i­tive impact the nat­ur­al envi­ron­ment and back­coun­try wilder­ness can have on humans.

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With an excep­tion­al staff, devot­ed exec­u­tive team, and strong mis­sion, Last­ing Adven­tures has served over 5,000 kids and pro­vid­ed 1,500 schol­ar­ships to dis­ad­van­taged youth, allow­ing them to gain valu­able skills and real life experiences.

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Last­ing Adven­tures’ mis­sion is to pro­vide pos­i­tive youth devel­op­ment and edu­ca­tion­al oppor­tu­ni­ties to the gen­er­al pub­lic while also pro­vid­ing char­i­ta­ble assis­tance to oth­er­wise dis­ad­van­taged youth. The Clymb is proud to part­ner with such a force for good in the out­door space.

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Sup­port your adven­ture habit while sup­port­ing local providers.


For more infor­ma­tion about book­ing a trip with Last­ing Adven­tures, check out our Adven­tures page here.

Lost Cost Trail

Lost Cost TrailThis 26-mile stretch of rock-strewn North­ern Cal­i­for­nia coast­line was sup­posed to be a highway—but it was too rugged for the con­struc­tion equip­ment, so the builders of High­way 1 decid­ed to leave it untouched. Now it’s California’s most unde­vel­oped stretch of shore­line, acces­si­ble only to hik­ers and back­pack­ers with a sense of adven­ture. Think misty marine morn­ings, jagged rocky cliffs, and sweep­ing sandy beach­es. And the best part? It’s free for the taking.

How To Get There
Rough­ly five hours north of San Fran­cis­co, the Lost Coast Trail is locat­ed on the edge of the Bureau of Land Man­age­ment (BLM) King Range Nation­al Con­ser­va­tion Area on the west­ern edge of Hum­boldt Coun­ty in North­ern Cal­i­for­nia. The north­ern edge of the wilder­ness area is the town of Fer­n­dale, and the coast­line wan­ders for rough­ly 90 miles of unde­vel­oped inlets—the longest stretch of unde­vel­oped Pacif­ic coast­line in the Unit­ed States out­side of Alaska.

There are two stretch­es of the Lost Coast Trail: the north sec­tion and the south sec­tion. On the north sec­tion, you’ll be walk­ing on boul­ders, peb­bles, and sand. On the south sec­tion, the ele­va­tion gain and loss makes hik­ing much more challenging—some esti­mates even cite 12,000 feet of change, which is more than trav­el­ing in and out of the Grand Canyon. Most hik­ers vis­it the north part of the trail, head­ing south from Mat­tole Riv­er for rough­ly 26 miles.

There are sev­er­al com­mer­cial­ly oper­at­ed shut­tle ser­vices in the area. Research which stretch of the coast­line you’re inter­est­ed in hik­ing, then arrange for a ride so you can hike one-way, then hop a lift back to your car.

Lost Cost TrailWhen To Go
While the trail is tech­ni­cal­ly pos­si­ble all year, most hik­ers choose the warmer and dri­er months between April and Octo­ber. You’ll need to track the dai­ly tides because there are sev­er­al key sec­tions where cliffs and waves com­bine to make the trail impass­able at any­thing except low tide. Invest in a local tide table, and make sure you know how to read it. Also, keep in mind that the wind usu­al­ly blows in from the northwest—which means it’s often more pleas­ant to hike from north to south, so the wind is at your back.

Camp­ing
You can legal­ly camp any­where, but to min­i­mize your envi­ron­men­tal impact pitch your tent in a pre­vi­ous­ly estab­lished camp­site. Sites are first come, first serve, and most are locat­ed next to sea­son­al fresh­wa­ter streams, which are handy for cook­ing and refill­ing drink­ing water sup­plies. Remem­ber that all water used for drink­ing, cook­ing, and doing dish­es should be treated.

It is required that food be car­ried in a bear can­is­ter, and every mem­ber of each team is required to be car­ry­ing at least one bear-proof con­tain­er for stor­ing food and oth­er scent­ed items. Main­tain con­ver­sa­tion and car­ry bear spray while you’re hik­ing to keep the bears away. Remem­ber, all your food must fit inside the bear can­is­ter, so plan your meals accordingly.

And Final­ly
Don’t for­get your cam­era! You’ll see black bears, ele­phant seals, sea birds, otters, and more. The sun ris­es over sweep­ing panoram­ic views, and the Pacif­ic Ocean glis­tens in the dis­tance. Wear lots of sun­screen, take lots of pic­tures, and don’t for­get to take off your shoes and feel the sand between your toes.

Self-reg­is­ter for per­mits (free) at Mat­tole Riv­er trail­head (ca.blm.gov/arcata). For more infor­ma­tion, con­tact the Bureau of Land Management.

southern california hiking

southern california hikingFrom groomed paths high above the Pacif­ic Ocean to rugged trails used by coy­otes and oth­er wildlife on the desert floor, there are day hikes in South­ern Cal­i­for­nia for every kind of trail seek­er. Here’s a short-list for your next vis­it to SoCal.


1. The Goat Canyon Rail­road Tres­tle, Anza-Bor­rego State Park
Dis­tance: 4–6 miles

This hid­den hik­ing area in the high desert of San Diego will take you over desert­ed rail­road tracks, past half-fished tun­nels, and even­tu­al­ly to one of the tallest wood­en train tres­tles in the world. Whether you start from the top and make your way through pitch-black tun­nels or come up from the bot­tom walk­ing past native fan palms and spindly cac­ti, make sure to bring plen­ty of water and wear a hat. There are a few steep grades, but for the most part, it’s an easy walk. How­ev­er, you do want to stay heat smart and avoid this trail in the summer.


2. Tor­rey Pines State Nat­ur­al Reserve, La Jol­la, San Diego
Dis­tance: Varies

The trails at Tor­rey Pines can be crowd­ed on week­ends, but with so many paths to choose from you can quick­ly leave the tourists behind. The trails are marked and well main­tained, most­ly because you’ll want to stay on the paths—wandering off the trails can be haz­ardous with loose rocks and ero­sion. All trails lead to spec­tac­u­lar views of Tor­rey Pines State Beach and after your hike, you might want to scam­per down and take a swim in the ocean.


3. Caballero Canyon Trail, Tarzana, CA
Dis­tance: 1–2 miles

This mod­er­ate­ly easy hike on the Caballero Canyon Trail will give you views of wild­flow­ers and the Los Ange­les basin. Mean­der­ing trails take you up and over the small hills of this canyon with a few slip­pery slopes along the way. There are patch­es of bright col­ors along the dirt trails, and if you go in the evening, you can catch a spec­tac­u­lar sun­set and still have time to hus­tle to your car before dark.


4. Rose Val­ley Falls, Ojai
Dis­tance: 1–5 miles

This hike through Cal­i­for­nia oak trees to the mag­nif­i­cent 300-foot water­fall has a trail for both begin­ners and the more expe­ri­enced hik­er. Rose Val­ley water­fall is the tallest in the Topatopa Moun­tains, locat­ed in the Los Padres Nation­al For­est. The eas­i­er hike, which is only .08 round trip, has an ele­va­tion of 150 feet, so take your time. Once you get to the stun­ning low­er falls, you will be at the 100-foot tier, and you can stay and get your feet wet or con­tin­ue the adven­ture to the sec­ond tier of falls. Either way, this hike will inspire you to dis­cov­er more of the Ojai backcountry.


5. Eaton Canyon, Los Angeles
Dis­tance: 4 miles

For such a dry part of the state, South­ern Cal­i­for­nia has an abun­dance of run­ning water­falls includ­ing the 40-foot water­fall at the Eaton Canyon Nature Cen­ter in Los Angeles.

This nat­ur­al area locat­ed at the base of the San Gabriel Moun­tains is a 190-acre nature pre­serve with horse trails, a zoo, and creeks scat­tered around the nature reserve. Once you find the well-marked trail, be pre­pared to do a lit­tle boul­der-hop­ping across the creek—depending on the sea­son and rainfall—and con­tin­ue on the trail, which, at times, can be a lit­tle rugged. Once you arrive at the falls, you can cool down in the mist from the water­fall or put your feet in the small pool. The des­ti­na­tion is more crowd­ed in the sum­mer, but you can usu­al­ly find some qui­et time if you go dur­ing the week.


6. Ship­wreck Trail, Los Angeles
Dis­tance: 1–2 Miles

Hik­ing on dirt trails is great, but scam­per­ing over beach rocks and tide pools is a kick, espe­cial­ly when there’s a ship­wreck wait­ing for you at the end of the hike. In the ’60s, the SS Dom­i­na­tor ran aground off Palos Verdes, and after 50 years, it’s now a rust­ed hull. Sea life and the beach are enough to get you down to this shore, but be sure to wear decent shoes and leave the pooch at home. Once you fin­ish tak­ing those self­ies with the sunken ship, go body surf­ing and rest up for the rest of your hike. It’s easy to see why this one ranks as one of the best day hikes in South­ern California.

It’s no secret that Cal­i­for­nia offers some of the best surf­ing, skiing/snowboarding, moun­tain bik­ing, and rock climb­ing in the Unit­ed States. The state’s diverse geog­ra­phy is a big rea­son why so many action sports ath­letes call Cal­i­for­nia home. With the sup­port of Clif Bar, Jere­my Jones (Pro­fes­sion­al Big Moun­tain Snow­board­er), Greg Long (Pro­fes­sion­al Big Wave Surfer), Hila­ree O’Neill (Pro­fes­sion­al Ski Moun­taineer), and Matt Hunter (Pro­fes­sion­al Moun­tain Bik­er) skied, climbed, moun­tain biked, and surfed their way from the Sier­ra Neva­da Moun­tains to the Pacif­ic Ocean in a sin­gle day of end­less adven­ture. Watch as these world-class ath­letes put their ath­leti­cism to the test out­side of their com­fort zones while enjoy­ing a “Dream Day” in California.

How many of your favorite activ­i­ties can you pack into a sin­gle day?

Courtesy of California Women's Watersport Collective“Do one thing every day that scares you.”

Melis­sa DeMarie wasn’t the first kick­ass lady who said these words—I believe that was Eleanor Roo­sevelt. But as she stood in front of a bus full of 50 white­wa­ter women who had just charged down a stretch of Class III rapids, I knew that I wasn’t the only one who felt the words resonate.

All over the coun­try women are mobi­liz­ing into out­door adven­ture orga­ni­za­tions that cater specif­i­cal­ly to females, cre­at­ing a safe and fun space for them to learn from one anoth­er and test their lim­its. Last sum­mer, Melis­sa orga­nized and insti­gat­ed a women’s only water­sport coali­tion to get more girls out on the riv­er and con­nect­ing with each oth­er.  The group is called Cal­i­for­nia Women’s Water­sport Col­lec­tive, or Cali Col­lec­tive for short. Sev­er­al small­er events through­out the sum­mer cul­mi­nat­ed in the 2 day mul­ti-lev­el clin­ic, which was host­ed with the sup­port of She­Jumps on August 1 and 2.

Stu­dents ranged from expe­ri­enced boaters to girls who had nev­er even sat in a white­wa­ter kayak before. On the first day, we met at the Cal­i­for­nia Canoe and Kayak out­post in Colo­ma, Cal­i­for­nia, on the banks of the South Fork of the Amer­i­can Riv­er. We gath­ered our gear and split up into our class­es for the day. The 101 group was made up of the begin­ners who prac­ticed basics on flat­wa­ter, the 201 girls refined core tech­niques and skills on class II rapids, and the 301 crew took on the more chal­leng­ing III+ Chili Bar section.

Cali-Collective-4As I round­ed up my bor­rowed gear and cir­cled up with the rest of the 201 ladies, I noticed that the instruc­tors were just as stoked as the stu­dents. Every­one I met was just so hap­py to be there, to meet women who shared the same pas­sions for adven­ture and action regard­less of skill lev­el. There were about 1–2 teach­ers for every 4–5 stu­dents, mak­ing it a super safe envi­ron­ment to chal­lenge our­selves and try new things.

That evening, all skill lev­els recon­vened and set up camp along the riv­er, stretched out our bod­ies with a relax­ing yoga ses­sion, and gath­ered for a safe­ty talk and some good ol’ lady bonding.

The next morn­ing start­ed off with anoth­er split of skill lev­els. The more advanced group took a crash course in slalom rac­ing while the rest of us worked on our rolls.

For those of you who haven’t had the plea­sure of being upside down in a kayak, with your knees and hips wedged in the boat and water rush­ing up your nose, let me just assure that it’s as chal­leng­ing to prac­tice as it sounds. Know­ing how to roll your­self up when you flip, how­ev­er, is an impor­tant part of pro­gress­ing as a kayaker.

After strug­gling with my roll all morn­ing, I was still deter­mined to boat the Class III sec­tion of the South Fork in a hard shell. The oth­er option would be to hop in an inflat­able kayak, which you don’t need a roll to pad­dle down the riv­er. I.K.s don’t allow you near­ly the same amount of con­trol as a hard shell kayak that cov­ers your legs, how­ev­er, and I want­ed to be able to prac­tice the skills that I had worked on the day before. Also, I felt like I had some­thing to prove. Not to any of the women out there that week­end, but to myself.

Melis­sa, who had been help­ing me work on my roll, seemed sur­prised when I told her my plan to boat the Gorge, the class III sec­tion that all skill lev­els were doing togeth­er that day in a vari­ety of water crafts. She and my instruc­tor for the week­end, the incred­i­ble Sara James, only gave me pos­i­tive encour­age­ment, how­ev­er. The next thing I knew, I was fol­low­ing Sara’s expert moves that set me up per­fect­ly through rapids with names like Bounc­ing Rock, Satan’s Cesspool, and Hos­pi­tal Bar.

Cali-Collective-2I was push­ing my com­fort zone, but I don’t think I have ever been more com­fort­able in my own skin.

“Our main objec­tive is to build com­mu­ni­ty, which is some­thing that I real­ly feel we have lost in our cul­ture and soci­ety,” explains Melis­sa. She and co-founder Tra­cy Tate have cre­at­ed a wel­com­ing and sup­port­ive envi­ron­ment that mir­rors trends in women’s out­door sports nationwide.

“I believe there is such strong inter­est in what we’re doing from women, not only in North­ern Cal­i­for­nia but across the coun­try, because what we are offer­ing extends beyond pad­dle sports,” she adds.  “I feel women are attract­ed to the idea of being a part of a group where they feel sup­port­ed and accept­ed. We have adopt­ed a holis­tic approach by incor­po­rat­ing things such as yoga, Pilates and nutri­tion into our clin­ics which is appeal­ing as well.”

Cali Collective’s 2 day event was a huge suc­cess, but the orga­ni­za­tion doesn’t plan on stop­ping with that. 2016 events include mul­ti-day trips in Ore­gon and Ida­ho, surf kayak­ing clin­ics on the Cal­i­for­nia Coast, and a 10 day white­wa­ter trip in Chile—all women only.

“Being a new orga­ni­za­tion, we have the whole world ahead of us and the pos­si­bil­i­ties of what we can build and cre­ate is lim­it­less,” Melis­sa con­tin­ues. “I think the thing that I’m most excit­ed about is that it’s already working—meaning women are con­nect­ing with oth­er like-mind­ed indi­vid­u­als, mak­ing new friends and learn­ing in a non-com­pet­i­tive and friend­ly environment.”

As female ath­letes in high adren­a­line sports, most of us are famil­iar with over­com­ing our fears in one way or anoth­er. It’s a great time to be a woman involved in out­door adven­ture. Orga­ni­za­tions like Cali Col­lec­tive are pop­ping up left and right, cre­at­ing a unique cul­ture of women who under­stand that fear can be a beau­ti­ful thing. With­out fear and self-doubt, I wouldn’t real­ize my own awe­some and empow­er­ing abil­i­ty to over­come them.

cali-collective-3About CWWC
The goal of Cal­i­for­nia Wom­en’s Water­sport Col­lec­tive is to help fos­ter a com­mu­ni­ty of women by using pad­dle­sports as the medi­um. They pro­vide clin­ics and trips in white­wa­ter, lake and sea kayak­ing, standup pad­dle­board (SUP) and surf­ing, as well as com­mu­ni­ty events such as yoga and nutri­tion. The founders, Melis­sa DeMarie and Tra­cy Tate, are both pro­fes­sion­al guides and instruc­tors and have a com­bined 30+ years of expe­ri­ence in the out­door indus­try and have trav­elled and worked around the world in such loca­tions as New Zealand, Africa, Nepal, Cos­ta Rica, Colum­bia, Chile and Nor­way. They offer many col­lab­o­ra­tive events with com­pa­nies through­out Cal­i­for­nia, Ore­gon, Ida­ho and Chile, which extends their reach con­sid­er­ably. Begin­ning in Feb­ru­ary 2016 they launched their “Col­lec­tive Out­reach Pro­gram” aimed to bring demo­graph­ics of women to the out­doors who do not nec­es­sar­i­ly have access, be it due to phys­i­cal or finan­cial lim­i­ta­tions. Their first Out­reach project is with Images of Hope in El Dora­do Coun­ty, which is a non-prof­it ded­i­cat­ed to pro­vid­ing alter­na­tive ther­a­pies to can­cer patients such as art, music and move­ment. CWWC is also involved with var­i­ous kayak and surf fes­ti­vals through­out the Northwest.

All Pho­tos Cour­tesy of Cal­i­for­nia Wom­en’s Water­sport Col­lec­tive and Melis­sa DeMarie

You may have come to San Luis Obispo County (SLO CAL) for the adventure, but you’ll want to stay for the moments in between. With plenty of room to wander, the seemingly-endless possibilities will make for an unforgettable experience.

F r e e   T o   R o a m
Along­side all of the adven­ture offer­ings, this area is also a bustling hub for food, cul­ture, and much more. We’ve put togeth­er an insid­er guide for those moments in between your morn­ing hike and your sun­set surf.

Start your day in the town of San Luis Obis­po by bik­ing to one of the many local cof­fee shops. Grab a lat­te, hang out, or walk through SLO’s his­toric down­town before head­ing out for the day’s adven­ture, you’ll leave know­ing why this town was recent­ly named one of “America’s Hap­pi­est Cities.”

The 240-year-old creek­side  Mis­sion San Luis Obis­po de Tolosa that SLO is built around is a promi­nent land­mark, and seeps cul­ture into the sur­round­ing area. The span­ish-style white-washed build­ings and tow­er­ing cam­phor trees that line the road­ways make for a pic­turesque scene in the his­toric streets. 


The same great weath­er is large­ly respon­si­ble for the coun­ty’s live­ly food scene. The deep agri­cul­tur­al roots are evi­dent in the vast open spaces with graz­ing cat­tle, road-side farms, and award-win­ning winer­ies that blan­ket the region. Start your tour up in Paso Rob­les – the coun­ty’s bur­geon­ing wine hub which rivaled Napa Val­ley in wine pro­duc­tion last year –and spend your day ram­bling down the 101.

From there, cruise on down to Tem­ple­ton, where his­toric store­fronts are brim­ming with fresh cui­sine and local liba­tions. Keep mov­ing south to the Avi­la Val­ley Barn, a region­al hotspot. Their farm­stand offers a boun­ty of fruits and veg­eta­bles grown on the prop­er­ty and there is always a line for their fresh-baked pies. After you’ve eat­en your fill, head out for a stroll at the near-by Bob Jones Trail, which runs through the val­ley to the coast, mak­ing for a relax­ing jaunt any­time of the day.

The Vil­lage of Arroyo Grande is a must-see if you find your­self roam­ing a lit­tle fur­ther south. With roost­ers wan­der­ing the streets that are lined with local­ly owned shops and restau­rants, you’ll find your­self steeped in small-town charm. No mat­ter where the road takes you, there’s almost cer­tain­ly some­thing fresh await­ing your arrival. Take it from us, you won’t want to miss your chance to take advan­tage of the local flavors.

We can’t think of a bet­ter way to end a day of adven­tur­ing than with a stop by the Madon­na Inn. The flashy inte­ri­or and sig­na­ture pink is a sight worth see­ing. Grab a piece of their famous cake and spend the evening plan­ning tomorrow’s escapades.

G e
t ti n g    T h e r e
Now with direct flights from Den­ver, San Fran­cis­co, Seat­tle, and more, get­ting to SLO CAL is eas­i­er than ever. Come stay and hang out, we dare you to get bored in this explorer’s paradise.


This beau­ti­ful short film takes you on a jour­ney through Cal­i­for­ni­a’s Red­wood Nation­al and State Parks. It’s the fourth install­ment in a series by More Than Just Parks project, which was found­ed in an effort to “effect a greater aware­ness of the trea­sures that reside with­in Amer­i­ca’s Nation­al Parks.”

With luck (and a lit­tle fund­ing) More Than Just Parks will give their stun­ning video treat­ment to all 59 nation­al parks. If you like what they’re doing, tell the film­mak­ers about it at morethanjustparks@gmail.com or pop over to their web­site and kick the team a small dona­tion to help keep the project going.

Mav­er­icks, in North­ern Cal­i­for­nia, is a rel­a­tive new­com­er to the big wave surf­ing scene. Three surfers first attempt­ed the break in 1961 with a white-haired Ger­man Shep­ard named Mav­er­ick that wouldn’t stay put on the shore. The surfers had lim­it­ed suc­cess, and by all accounts, Mav­er­ick had the most fun that day. It would be more than a decade before Jeff Clark, a 17-year-old high school stu­dent in Half Moon Bay, became the first per­son to suc­cess­ful­ly ride the 20-foot waves.

The break remained a secret for the next 15 years.

It wasn’t until 1990, when Clark’s friend pub­lished a pho­to in Surfer mag­a­zine that the surf­ing com­mu­ni­ty tru­ly noticed. It was like find­ing Pipeline or Jaws, leg­endary Hawai­ian surf breaks, right in their own back­yard. But there was a catch; a very good rea­son why no one was surf­ing there.

In 2007, NOAA released maps of the sea floor at Mav­er­icks. They show a long, slop­ing ramp of ocean­ic crust that ris­es from the depths toward shore. Surfers call this ramp “The Thumb,” and there are numer­ous shelves of rock on it. Pow­er­ful win­ter swells gen­er­at­ed from mid-Pacif­ic storms ride The Thumb as the first point of con­tact with land and then explode with tremen­dous force upon the reef, near­ly two miles offshore.

It’s a very dan­ger­ous place to wipe­out. As leg­endary surfers began flock­ing to Mav­er­icks through­out the 90s they began to learn that the hold downs could be par­tic­u­lar­ly long and bru­tal. Mark Foo’s trag­ic, and untime­ly death in 1994 high­light­ed the extreme dan­ger of get­ting pinned among the under­wa­ter rocks, but even still, the surf break’s rep­u­ta­tion grew.

Now it has reached super­star sta­tus with a cameo in the surf doc­u­men­tary Rid­ing Giants in 2004, a Hol­ly­wood biopic called Chas­ing Mav­er­icks, and it plays host to the infa­mous Mav­er­icks Invi­ta­tion­al surf com­pe­ti­tion that kicks off this week.

Dur­ing the com­pe­ti­tion, you can watch live-stream­ing footage here.

Is your com­mute get­ting a lit­tle monot­o­nous? Maybe it’s time for a change of per­spec­tive. Watch this video for a point-of-view ride on an insane­ly tall bike through the streets of L.A. This bike gives its rid­er the best seat in the house as he tow­ers above traf­fic and fel­low cyclists. Just watch out for low hang­ing over­pass­es and pow­er lines.

The bike that’s being rid­den in this video has no sus­pen­sion, no hydraulic disc brakes, no car­bon fiber, and def­i­nite­ly lacks a drop­per seat post. Back in the day, it all began with beefed up cruis­er bikes being pushed to the top of hill by a bunch of Cal­i­for­nia hip­pies. They called it “Klunk­ing,” and this was the birth of moun­tain biking.

Tech­nol­o­gy has come a long way, but it’s safe to say that these OG’s were hav­ing just as much fun play­ing in the dirt as we are today on our high­ly engi­neered rigs. Check out this video of UCLA foot­ball play­er Carl Hulick get­ting back to his roots, and prov­ing that hav­ing fun on the trails is not all about rid­ing the lat­est and great­est gear.

Now Hiring- Where to Move to Work in the Outdoors

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’s every enthu­si­ast’s dream, to get paid to do what we pay to do. Park rangers, advo­ca­cy direc­tors, con­ser­van­cy plan­ners, brand mar­keters, and on and on. The out­door indus­try rep­re­sents a mas­sive amount of employ­ment oppor­tu­ni­ties if you know where to look for them. To get your dream job, you’ve got to go where the dreams live. Below is a list of the best places in the coun­try for out­door indus­try jobs. Con­tin­ue read­ing